What is Laser Vision Correction?

What are the Laser Vision Correction procedures called?

Who is a candidate?

What is the success rate?

How many require a second operation or “touch up” surgery?

Are both eyes operated on at the same time?

What are the possible risks?

How long will it take?

Will I be asleep during the procedure?

What is the recovery period?

Does it hurt after the anesthetic wears off?

Is there still a chance I will need glasses after the procedure?

If I do need glasses after surgery, can I wear contacts?

Will this surgery interfere with possible cataract surgery in the future?

What are the long-term risks of this surgery?

Is the surgery reversible?

What are the other technologies available?

Will I need reading glasses after surgery?

Is there any way to avoid wearing reading glasses after forty?

Is it safe?

What Laser is used for the Surgery?

Is one laser better than another?

I’m pregnant. Can I have Laser Vision Correction?

I have Diabetes. Can I have Laser Vision Correction?

What to expect pre and post-operative?

 

What is Laser Vision correction?
A procedure performed by a specially trained Ophthalmologist to correct nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism. The Excimer laser uses a cool beam of ultraviolet light to sculpt the cornea into a desired shape, to enable the eye to focus properly without glasses and contact lenses.

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 What are the Laser Vision Correction procedures called? 
PRK ( Photorefractive Keratectomy)
LASIK (Laser Assisted In-Situ Keratomilieusis)

 Who is a candidate? 
18 years or older
Stable refraction for at least a year
Nearsighted (myopia)
Farsighted (hyperopia)
Astigmatism
Requires a complete consultation to determine candidacy

What is the success rate? 
100% improved uncorrected or normal vision
98% see 20/40 or better (driving legally without glasses)
80% see 20/20 or better

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How many require a second operation or “touch up” surgery? 
Less than 3% of NewView Laser Eye patients have required “touch up” surgery. The chance of needing a second operation to achieve optimal results increases with high amounts of correction. “Touch up” surgeries are generally done at no additional charge

Are both eyes operated on at the same time? 
Both eyes can be done on the same day.
There is little risk to having the procedure performed on both eyes at the same time.

What are the possible risks? 
As with any surgical procedure, there are risks.
The risks with Laser Vision Correction are minimal, but these will be explained to you in full prior to the procedure.

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How long will it take? 
The actual laser time is usually less than a minute.
Most patients are in and out of the laser suite within 15 minutes.

Will I be asleep during the procedure? 
No. The surgeon will need your complete cooperation during the procedure. You will receive very strong anesthetic drops before the procedure. You may also be given a light anti-anxiety medication just prior to the procedure.

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What is the recovery period? 
Most patients return to work the next day after LASIK.
Most patients return to work in one week after PRK.

Does it hurt after the anesthetic wears off? 
After PRK, there is a mild to moderate degree of discomfort for a period of three to four days. After the LASIK procedure, there is a period of two to three hours when there is a burning sensation in the eyes like swimming in heavy chlorinated water. Generally, patients are quite comfortable within a very short time after LASIK.

Is there still a chance I will need glasses after the procedure? 
98% of patients see 20/40 or better after the procedure, which is good enough to drive without corrective eyewear. While there are no guarantees that you can throw away your contacts and glasses, it is highly unlikely that you will be reliant on corrective eyewear for your daily activities.

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 If I do need glasses after surgery, can I wear contacts? 
While it is highly unlikely you will need corrective eyewear after the procedure, contact lenses are a possibility after the procedure. In cases of treatments of severe amounts of myopia, there is a small chance that the cornea would be too flat to accommodate a contact lens.

Will this surgery interfere with possible cataract surgery in the future? 
Technically, cataract surgery can safely be performed after Laser Vision Correction. The calculation of the correct power for the implant to be placed is slightly different and not as accurate after Laser Vision Correction.

What are the long-term risks of this surgery? 
The first PRK procedure was performed on a human eye in 1988. The first LASIK procedure was performed on a human eye in 1994. While long term results are not known, patients done in these years continue to be stable and very happy with the results.

Is the surgery reversible? 
Laser Vision Correction is not reversible. A new technology in Vision Correction called Intracorneal Rings is reversible.

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What are the other technologies available? 
Radial Keratotomy is still available, although not widely done since the advent of Laser Vision Correction. Intacs or Intracorneal Rings have received FDA approval to treat mild degrees of myopia. They do not treat astigmatism or farsightedness. They are reversible. Laser Vision Correction is the most popular procedure and will be for many years to come.

Will I need reading glasses after surgery? 
If you are under the age of forty, it is unlikely that you will need reading glasses after the procedure. Over the age of forty, our eyes experience a decrease in focusing ability. This is a natural part of aging. With or without surgery, people usually need reading glasses after a certain age. Some nearsighted people start taking their glasses off to read after the age of forty. They are, in effect using their nearsightedness as a “cheating” mechanism to read. If a nearsighted person has Laser Vision Correction after the age of forty, they will no longer be able to cheat and will therefore need reading glasses.

Is there any way to avoid wearing reading glasses after forty? 
Some patients opt for Monovision which is essentially correcting one eye for distance and one eye for near. The eye corrected for near is simply left slightly nearsighted. About half of people adapt well to Monovision.

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Is it safe? 
Laser Vision Correction is very safe. It is not without some degree of risk but the incidence is quite low. It is probably safer to have a one-time procedure such as Laser Vision Correction than to constantly put a foreign body such as a contact lens in the eye. The risk for a sight threatening infection is tremendously higher with contact lens wear than with Laser Vision Correction.

 What Laser is used for the Surgery? 
While our preferred Laser is the VISX Star S4, we also offer surgery with the LADARVISION by Autonomous. VISX Star S4 has a three dimensional active tracker which helps ensure the treatment stays well centered. It also has a “blend” program for patients with large pupils to decrease their risk of post-operative halos. LADAR has similar programs. Both have the same number of FDA approvals but VISX has more of a track record and is preferred by 70% of refractive surgeons, we use the VISX laser for the majority of our patients.

Is one laser better than another? 
Results from FDA studies show that the results are similar among all the approved technologies. The approved lasers may vary in the manner in which they treat refractive errors but the end result appears to be the same. Some Centers attempt to “up-sell” one laser over another for monetary reasons. There is no basis for this practice and NewView does not engage in such activity.

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I’m pregnant. Can I have Laser Vision Correction? 
We do not perform Laser Vision Correction if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. The timing before and after these activities varies among refractive surgeons. Please call us for details.

I have Diabetes. Can I have Laser Vision Correction? 
As long as your blood sugars and refractions are stable and there is no active diabetic eye disease, you can pursue Laser Vision Correction.

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What to expect pre and post-operative? 

PREPARING FOR LASIK

The following instructions are to help you prepare for your LASIK surgery. Please do not hesitate to ask questions on any of the material covered.

Contact Lenses:

To achieve the best possible results, contact lenses must be left out of the operative eye(s) the specified amount of time both before the exam AND surgery.

· Soft or Disposable lenses – 4 days
· Gas Permeable or Hard lenses – 3 weeks

Eye Make-Up:

Eye make-up should be removed and not worn two full days prior to surgery. It is recommended that you cleanse the eyelids thoroughly two days prior to the procedure. Please know that even with great care fine particles (mascara) may remain in the eye. Two days following surgery eye make-up may be resumed. Take special care not to rub eyes with eye make-up removal.

Perfume/Cologne:

Please do not wear perfume or cologne the day of surgery. The evaporation fumes can interfere with the laser optics.

Clothing:

Wear comfortable clothing the day of surgery. You should especially avoid anything tight around the neck area.

Day of Surgery:

You must have someone drive you home after your procedure. Please plan to arrive 30 minutes early to allow time to prepare for surgery. Please bring your informed consent with you. It should notbe signed prior to the procedure. We need to witness your signature. You will also need to bring the prescribed antibiotic eye drops.

Follow-up Care:
We will see you at the following intervals:
· 1 day after surgery – quick visit to check vision and flap
· 1 week post-op – expanded testing with dilation of pupils
· 3 month post-op – expanded testing with dilation of pupils (end of post-op period)
· 1 year post-op – regular complete eye exam

Post-operative restrictions:

No swimming, hot tub or contact sports for one week following the procedure. No scuba diving for one month following the procedure

Post LASIK Protection:

Doctors agree that blocking glare, ultraviolet rays, and infrared light will protect and enhance your investment in better vision. We recommend wearing polarized sunglasses to protect your eyes after surgery.